Jump to content
Soundtrack Board
Gast Steffen S.

Jerry Goldsmith

Empfohlene Beiträge

Am 5.5.2017 um 11:27 schrieb horner1980:

Damit bekommt Jerry sogar vor John WIlliams einen Stern.

Aber nach Hans Zimmer...:D

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 9 Stunden schrieb HamburgerSchueler:

Goldsmirh über die Arbeit an Basic Instinct.

http://www.runmovies.eu/jerry-goldsmith-on-scoring-basic-instinct/

Das ist einer der interessantesten Interviews mit Maestro Goldsmith, er gibt hier sehr viele Antworten auf Fragen die wir über die Jahre hier und da gestellt haben! :D

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ja, das klingt wirklich prima. Die Musik kommt auch in der notwendigen "Schroffheit" daher ... so würde ich mir eine Neuaufnahme wünschen.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Am Freitag, den 13. Oktober, läuft im Kino des Deutschen Filmmuseums Frankfurt a.M. Denis Sanders' Psychiatrie-Thriller SHOCK TREATMENT (1964) in einer 35mm-Kopie. Davor gibt es eine kleine Einführung von mir, zum Film und zur Musik von Jerry Goldsmith. Wer in der Nähe ist und Zeit hat, ist herzlich eingeladen zu kommen!

shock-treatment-flyer2.jpg.bd90eff2bd080b712f527f624c8be7a7.jpg

 

  • Like 3

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Das hat gerade jemand auf Facebook gepostet.. ein mir persönlich unbekanntes, aber sehr interessantes Interview mit Jerry Goldsmith

Zitat

 

With the release of “Star Trek: Insurrection,” composer Jerry Goldsmith has completed his fourth orchestral score for a “Star Trek” feature film. During the past 35 years, the composer has written some of the most memorable film and television music ever. His 100-plus film scores are remarkably diverse, including “Alien,” “Chinatown,” “Basic Instinct” and last summer’s “Mulan.”

Born in Los Angeles in1929, Goldsmith studied with Jakob Gimple and Mario Castelnuevo-Tedesco in the 1940s. He went on to write for such television shows as “Gunsmoke” and “The Twilight Zone” before writing his first film score for the 1956 western “The Black Patch.”

In a rare break in his schedule — he has written six scores since January — Goldsmith spoke with The Jewish Journal at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jewish Journal: How did you begin in music?

Jerry Goldsmith: My grandfather gave my parents a piano for a wedding present. I started taking piano lessons when I was 6. More piano lessons, and then I started getting serious about it when I was 12. When I was 14, I really thought I was going to be a concert pianist and I was composing little pieces, and that was it: I decided I wanted to be a musician, wanted to study music.

JJ: Has anti-Semitism been an obstacle to overcome in your career?

JG: I may have lost some job somewhere along the line because I’m Jewish, but I don’t think so, because most of the people I have worked for are Jewish. It doesn’t necessarily mean anything. There are many self-deprecating Jews out there who are sorry they are Jews. I’m sure it’s there. It has never gone away.

There was one old-time director, a great director, and I did his last picture — why am I being coy? He’s dead. It was Howard Hawks. I just read his biography, and it said he was an anti-Semite. It was a shock to me. He was very nice to me. He was very old and sort of out of it, but he couldn’t have been nicer. He gave me a hand-tooled belt as a present. Maybe he didn’t know I was Jewish. I don’t know. I hear more stories about it in the past than I do today.

JJ: How has being Jewish influenced your work?

JG: I’m very aware of my Jewishness. As I’ve gotten older and older, I find that I’m more secure in it and more comfortable with it. I think my son’s bar mitzvah was the third-happiest day of my life, the first being when I married his mother, then his birth, then his bar mitzvah.

My wife has just turned 50 and just got bat mitzvahed. My wife has probably made me more aware of my Jewishness, making sure that we get to High Holy Day services and we light the candles every Friday night and observe the Sabbath to a certain extent.

As far as the music is concerned, it’s interesting the two major things that I’ve done were “QB VII” and “Masada.” I just felt like nobody else could have written this music and done what I did. There’s some gene or something particularly Jewish or, at least, that I’m Jewish that I have this affinity for this kind of music that only a Jew can do. It seems like a pompous and arrogant thing to say. I really think that only Jews can relate to this kind of feeling.

In the score for “First Knight,” the final battle scene was temp-tracked with the ubiquitous “Carmina Burana.” The director said, “We’ve got to have a chorus singing in this big battle of six or seven minutes.” I didn’t know what a chorus was going to do. He said, “Don’t even bother writing it. We’ll just use the ‘Carmina Burana.'” At that time, it seemed rather a great idea because I was so pressed for time. Actually, it was a combination of my agent and my wife who said: “Don’t do it. Don’t take the easy way out. Do it right.” So I said, “OK, I’ll do music for it, but the chorus has to say something.” So I sat there for hours with the director, who’s also Jewish, and I said, “Give me some words for the chorus to sing, and I’ll get it translated into Latin, and we’ll be off and running.” So we picked the “Shma.” So if you listen to the big battle scene, it’s the “Shma” translated into Latin with orchestra and chorus.

JJ: Do instruments belong in the synagogue?

JG: Yes, I think so. I find a correlation, a similarity between synagogues and concerts. The trick is to get young people involved. I’ve been a member at Steven S. Wise for 25 years, and there has always been an emphasis on the musical aspect of it. I was shocked the first time I went there and the cantor was playing a guitar, and it was very hip…and they’re constantly writing new music. Michael Isaacson is the music director there and really a beautiful singer. I’d like to write something for it if I have enough time…if only we spoke Latin instead of Hebrew.

I think our older liturgical music has been steeped in Christian-sounding music. I used to hear these chorales, as a kid, that could have been used in a Presbyterian church as far as I was concerned. Just translate the words into English. Then I heard some of the new music being written, and it was wonderful, so I went and I saw a lot of younger faces and a tremendous congregation. I didn’t know it could be that way. It caught one of the great aspects of Judaism. And they do instrumental music. I remember, on Yom Kippur, hearing the Kol Nidre on cello. It was very moving.

JJ: What is the role of electronics in the classical music of the future?

JG: I don’t know yet. My enthusiasm has certainly waned from the mid ’80s, when I thought it was the end-all to everything and the new salvation of music. The role that I had always hoped electronics would be is a means and not an end. I had hoped it would be an adjunct to the orchestra, a new section. As much as I use electronics, in concert I try to use the real thing. Right now, I’m in limbo about electronics.

JJ: When Samson lost his long hair, he lost all his strength and was enslaved. What would happen to Jerry Goldsmith if he lost his famous ponytail.

JG: I’d be unrecognizable. I’m thinking about getting it cut after this concert season. Who knows?
Quelle: http://jewishjournal.com/old_stories/1351/

 

 

  • Thanks 2

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich höre gerade mal wieder den "post Alien" Soundtrack zu "Outland". Einer meiner absoluten Lieblingsscores von ihm, entstanden in seiner (wie ich finde) kreativsten Phase, also Anfang der 80iger Jahre. Ich bin jedesmal absolut fasziniert davon, wie die Musiker es tatsächlich schaffen den Titel "Hot Water" zu spielen, ohne ihre Instrumente zu vernichten. Der Höhepunkt des Tracks ist dermaßen schnell ... Wow. Wie gesagt, schon tausend mal gehört, aber immer wieder faszinierend, was der Meister da geschaffen hat.

  • Like 1

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ja, Outland ist für mich auch ein Highlight. Aber nicht nur die Musik, sondern mit dem Film bin ich aufgewachsen und Sean Connery ist mein Lieblingsschauspieler seit je her.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich habe mich nie wirklich mit Outland auseinandergesetzt. Ich habe mir den Score zwar angehört aber es ist Nichts hängen geblieben.

Sollte mich mal intensiver damit beschäftigen, vor allem mit dem Track Hot Water ... danke für den Hinweis. :)

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich fand den - gerade im Vergleich mit anderen, komplexen Actiontracks von Goldsmith - nie sonderlich spannend. Vor allem rhythmisch doch sehr überschaubar (eigentlich fast durchgehend 4/4, mit meist eher regelmäßigen Akzenten), ab 3:00 dann durchgehend stampfig. Sowas ist auch nicht allzu schwer zu spielen - zumindest nicht so wild, dass es eine Herausforderung für Musiker oder Instrumente wäre, @direx

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich finde Outland nicht nur wegen der Actiontracks, sondern vom gesamten Score her ausgezeichnet als Teil seiner kurz hintereinander komponierten "Outer Space"-Trilogie. Alien, Star Trek: Der Film und Outland. Die reinsten Tongemälde, wo Goldsmith perfekt die Kälte, das Mysteriöse, das Unbekannte des Alls meisterlich in Musik gesetzt hat.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

In Sachen OUTLAND finde ich ja den Film fast interessanter als den Score... Atmosphärische Musik auf jeden Fall, aber in der Suspense- und vor allem Actionmusik ist es doch alles etwas uncharakteristisch, beinahe beliebig, und dazu auch kompositorisch ziemlich straight (siehe oben).

In meinen Augen sind die Lobeshymnen auf den Score vor allem der (mündlich unter Fans) überlieferten Rezeptionshaltung geschuldet, dass es sich hier um den "kleinen Bruder" von ALIEN handelt. Das generierte schon damals einen Haufen Aufmerksamkeit, die ich so nicht unbedingt gerechtfertigt finde, denn an ALIEN erinnert hier höchstens die Kälte und Düsternis des Gesamteindrucks. So kunstvoll-expressive, hochkomplexe Sätze wie "The Droid" aus ALIEN, oder auch so spannende modale Harmonik wie in der Musik für den Alien-Planeten konnte ich in OUTLAND nie ausmachen. Aber vielleicht ist mir auch was entgangen - habe die FSM-CD mittlerweile schon einige Jahre nicht mehr gehört. 

  • Like 2

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich habe mir nun "Hot Water" angehört, ein ordentliches Action-Stück das, wenn es in der heutigen Zeit komponiert wäre, wie eine Offenbarung klingen würde bei den vielen belanglosen Beiträgen (siehe Aquaman), aber im Vergleich zu den anderen Action-Werken von Maestro Goldsmith, müsste Outland doch den kürzeren ziehen. Da denke ich an THE MUMMY, LIONHEART, CONGO, THE EDGE, POLTERGEIST, STAR TREK, usw. 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 4 Stunden schrieb Csongor:

...aber im Vergleich zu den anderen Action-Werken von Maestro Goldsmith, müsste Outland doch den kürzeren ziehen. Da denke ich an THE MUMMY, LIONHEART, CONGO, THE EDGE, POLTERGEIST, STAR TREK, usw. 

Ich hätte da jetzt nicht unbedingt 90er-Jahre-Scores wie THE MUMMY oder THE EDGE herangezogen (die sind ja auch schon wesentlich simpler gestaltet), sondern eher die vertrackten Actiontracks aus seinen Musiken der 60er und 70er (z.B. "Finding Billy" aus DAMNATION ALLEY, oder "Pre-Flight Countdown" aus TORA! TORA! TORA!). Da geht in der Tat mindestens dreimal so viel ab wie in "Hot Water". 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Letzten Endes ist es doch die Wirkung, die die Musik im Film hat, die zählt. Ich höre Filmmusik rein emotional, kenne mich mit der zugrundeliegenden Technik nicht aus und deshalb gehört dieser Track zu meinen absoluten Favoriten in Sachen "Action".  Den Film hab ich mir vor Kurzem auf Blu Ray gegönnt und ich werde mir das Ding jetzt über die feiertage geben. Wenn ich mich recht erinnere war die dem Track zugrundeliegende Szene eher lahm. zwei Typen rennen verfolgen sich zu Fuß. Ich gehe mal davon aus, dass hier der Auftrag war, mehr Spannung in die eher maue Szene zu bekommen. Mission erfüllt, würde ich sagen ... :)

Ach ja, frohe Weihnachten euch allen ...

 

Direx

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Erstelle ein Benutzerkonto oder melde dich an, um zu kommentieren

Du musst ein Benutzerkonto haben, um einen Kommentar verfassen zu können

Benutzerkonto erstellen

Neues Benutzerkonto für unsere Community erstellen. Es ist einfach!

Neues Benutzerkonto erstellen

Anmelden

Du hast bereits ein Benutzerkonto? Melde dich hier an.

Jetzt anmelden

×

Wichtige Information

Wir nutzen auf unserer Webseite Cookies, um Ihnen einen optimalen Service zu bieten. Wenn Sie weiter auf unserer Seite surfen, stimmen Sie der Cookie-Verwendung und der Verarbeitung von personenbezogenen Daten über Formulare zu. Zu unserer Datenschutzerklärung: Datenschutzerklärung/Impressum