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  1. Sehr richtig, die Differenzierung zwischen europäischer Musik und US-amerikanischer (beziehungsweise US-amerikanischer Musik und jener aus allen anderen Ländern) muss natürlich gemacht werden. Die USA waren schon immer sehr selbstbezogen ;) Music Box macht die Erfahrung aktuell wieder wie von dir beschrieben, wir machen sie zum Beispiel mit Zbigniew Preisner. Threads bei FSM über ihn und seine Musik werden kaum geklickt und nicht kommentiert (sieht man aktuell an dem BBC-Interview, das er kürzlich gegeben hat und das ein Mensch bei FSM gepostet hat), allerdings wird Preisner in Polen fast wie ein Nationalheld verehrt. Unsere vier Preisner-CDs sind unsere Bestseller, um die sich das Publikum in Europa reißt. In den USA: Totenstille. Da wird dann eben die 569. Neuauflage von 'Robin Hood' bejubelt, als gäbe es kein Morgen mehr.
  2. Tatsächlich sagt das FSM Board aber auch nichts aus und ist für Labels grundsätzlich so überflüssig geworden wie ein Sandkasten in der Sahara. Das war früher noch anders, aber mittlerweile tummeln sich da ohnehin nur noch immer dieselben Nasen. Wir dachten zu unserem Beginn noch, das FSM sei unabdingbar für Marketing und Publicity. Das hat sich aber sehr schnell als Trugschluss herausgestellt. Es sagt nichts aus. Wir hatten Titel, um die sich beim FSM Board niemand geschert hat und die vielleicht einen Kommentar als Reaktion hervorgerufen haben. Diese Titel haben sich wie geschnitten Brot verkauft. Dann hatten wir Titel, über die sich die Nutzer tagelang rege ausgetauscht haben, die aber wie Blei bei uns im Regal liegen. Ich habe immer den Eindruck, dass die Nutzer dort sich für den Mittelpunkt der Welt halten, in Wahrheit aber für die Labels nichts (mehr) bewegen und von uns tatsächlich ignoriert werden könn(t)en.
  3. Caldera Records is proud to present Zbigniew Preisner's score for the motion picture "Angelica" from 2015, directed by Mitchell Lichtenstein. “Angelica” also tells a story of female empowerment. It is based on Arthur Phillips’ book of the same name, published in 2007, and adapted for the screen by Lichtenstein. Set in the Victorian age in England, Phillips and Lichtenstein describe the trials and tribulations of Constance (played by Jena Malone), a young woman who falls in love with a successful scientist. Their romance blossoms and leads to marriage. Eventually, a child is born, a girl they name Angelica. The birth is grueling, and Constance nearly loses her life. For her, everything changes in an instant: she is told in no uncertain terms by her doctor that she is to refrain from engaging in vaginal sex (and therefore become a “hortus conclusus”) – otherwise she will risk her health and quite possibly leave her daughter motherless. From this moment Constance goes into a downward-spiral. Zbigniew Preisner’s music pays tribute to the elegant romanticism of the 19th century, while at the same time weaving more experimental elements into it. The composer decided against creating specific leitmotifs for the individual characters. Instead, his music follows the story as it progresses. Hence, Preisner developed variations on the themes as demanded by the story. For example, there is no theme for Constance per se. Preisner follows her journey with various motifs and themes, divided into what the composer calls the “courtly” and the “modern.” The 38th CD-release of Caldera Records – a world premiere – features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was mastered by Leszek Kaminski and produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed by Zbigniew Preisner Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke 1. Main Titles (2:32) 2. Time Transitions (0:32) 3. Spirit Photo (0:46) 4. Microscope (0:54) 5. Home From Honeymoon (1:43) 6. Photo Montage (2:09) 7. Breakfast (1:42) 8. Hairbrush and Bedtime (1:30) 9. Monkey (0:53) 10. To Lab (1:48) 11. Exit Lab (1:49) 12. Ghost Cue I (0:41) 13. Constance Finds Goop (1:32) 14. Ghost Cue II (1:06) 15. Angelica Saw a Man (0:39) 16. Nora Goes to Anne’s (1:02) 17. Consoles Constance at the Wardrobe (1:00) 18. Night Passes Peacefully (0:31) 19. Constance in Bed (1:19) 20. Ghost Cue III (1:05) 21. Piano Lesson (1:08) 22. The Snake (1:20) 23. Escape to Anne (1:03) 24. Constance Wakes Up at Anne’s (0:39) 25. Dr. Miles Arrives (1:44) 26. Dr. Miles Part II (1:55) 27. Dr. Miles Leaves (2:20) 28. Constance Stabs Joseph (1:26) 29. Flashback (0:59) 30. The End Part I (1:14) 31. The End Part II (3:40) 32. End Credits Part I (0:56) 33. End Credits Part II (3:42) Listen to a 5 min clip here: For more information, please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/angelica/
  4. Caldera Records is proud to present the original score for the motion picture “Man at the Top” from 1973, directed by Mike Vardy, featuring music by Roy Budd. Writer John Braine established Joe Lampton as a ruthless force to be reckoned with when he published his novel “Room at the Top” in 1957. The film rights were snatched up immediately, and only two years later, Jack Clayton’s adaptation premiered in theaters. Following another outing in the cinema and a television series, Anglo-EMI, in collaboration with Hammer Films, decided to let Joe Lampton (now played by Kenneth Haigh) loose on the big screen once more. In 1973, “Man at the Top” premiered. Here, Joe Lampton is appointed Managing Director of ChemExport, a company overseen by Lord Ackerman, played by Harry Andrews. All is not well: six months later, it emerges that Lampton’s predecessor committed suicide. Slowly it becomes clear to Lampton that he might have been appointed to take the blame for a massive marketing blunder that could crush not only him but the whole company. Kenneth Haigh was delighted when he heard that Roy Budd had been contracted to write the music for “Man at the Top” since the actor had admired Budd’s music for a long time, especially “Get Carter”. His score for “Man at the Top” is quite similar to his most beloved composition in that it is equally sparse. The composer devised a simple motif for the titular character which is introduced on a cimbalom and which recurs throughout the whole score. Apart from the Hungarian instrument, Budd employs strings, flute, piano, harp and percussion to create a tense atmosphere fitting for the film. His leitmotif is particularly clever since, in its coldness and restraint, it doesn’t try to make Joe Lampton likeable, and yet manages to underscore the more tender moments in the film with a slight tension that the images lack. Moreover, “Man at the Top” gave Budd the opportunity to provide two memorable jazz pieces as source cues for dinner parties. The 37th CD-release of Caldera Records features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed and Conducted by Roy Budd Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Man at the Top 1. Opening (1:21) 2. Main Titles (1:18) 3. End Credits (1:45) 4. The Journey Continues (0:54) 5. Man at the Top (2:26) 6. Night is Falling (2:44) 7. Bedtime (3:58) 8. In the Woods (2:48) 9. Peeping Robin (0:28) 10. Change of Plan (1:12) 11. Bossa Nova (3:26) 12. In the Office (0:22) 13. Joe is Being Followed (1:06) 14. Swept Up in Memories (1:31) 15. In the Woods (alt.) (1:37) 16. Mingle With Me (5:55) Bonus: 17. Demo Jingle (2:20) 18. You Can Never Trust a Friend (2:49) 19. Pipe Tobacco (0:32) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/man-at-the-top-roy-budd For more information please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/man-at-the-top/
  5. Caldera Records is proud to present the original score for the motion picture “One Potato, Two Potato” from 1964, directed by Larry Peerce, featuring music by Gerald Fried. Peerce’s film, one of the first to discuss an interracial relationship openly in cinema, tells the story of a young single-mother named Julie (played by Barbara Barrie) who cares for her daughter all by herself after her husband abandoned her. Struggling with everyday life, she strikes up a friendship with Frank (Bernie Hamilton) who seems supportive and kind, giving Julie a respite from the nastiness she’s had to endure. It doesn’t take long for the two of them to fall in love. Although Julie and Frank are aware of the problems they are likely going to face as an interracial couple in the 60s, they decide to marry. Society, however, does not wish to grant them their happiness. Surprising for an independent film without any major studio backing, “One Potato, Two Potato” scored an Oscar nomination for its screenplay. As beloved as his music for both “Star Trek” and “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” is, composer Gerald Fried considers “One Potato, Two Potato” one of his best works. It is a score which is dear to his heart, not least because the film tackles a subject that the composer felt strongly about. The memorable main theme makes several appearances throughout the album, at times playful and jaunty, at other times tense and introspective. As a contrast, Fried developed a sorrowful and yet warm lament as accompaniment for both Julie and Frank who try to overcome the various prejudices and other hurdles society presents them with. While there are several other motifs and themes in the score, the nursery rhyme serves as the backbone of the whole composition. The 36th CD-release of Caldera Records features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed and Conducted by Gerald Fried Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke One Potato Two Potato 1. One Potato, Two Potato (2:52) 2. Spotlight/How Many Times (2:05) 3. Love’s Old Sweet Song/How Many Times (2:17) 4. Hopscotch (1:53) 5. One Potato, Two Potato/How Many Times (2:16) 6. Outcasts (1:19) 7. We’re the Same (1:25) 8. The Marriage (1:00) 9. Cold Reception (1:11) 10. Not for Fools/One Potato, Two Potato (1:46) 11. Shooting Games (1:56) 12. Show-Down Hoe-Down (1:01) 13. Turmoil (1:41) 14. Help (1:08) 15. Attempted Rape (1:45) 16. Frustration (1:44) 17. Honor and Protect (1:15) 18. How Many Times/Alone With a Memory (2:43) 19. The Judge (3:01) 20. The Decision/Sorrow (3:22) 21. Departure (1:35) 22. One Potato, Two Potato (2:11) 23. One Potato, Two Potato (Vocal) (2:14) (Performed by Alan Arkin with The Frieds, Daniel, Debbie, Jonathon & Josh) Bonus: 24. Audio Commentary by Gerald Fried (6:53) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/one-potato-two-potato-gerald-fried For more information please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/one-potato-two-potato/
  6. Caldera Records is proud to present the original scores for the motion pictures “Flame in the Wind” and “Sheffey” from 1971 and 1977 respectively. Both films were produced by Unusual Film, a division of Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina. “Flame in the Wind” is set during the time of the Spanish Inquisition and follows a young man named Carlos who is faced with a conflict throughout the course of the motion picture: should he, horrified by the Inquisition, follow the Bible, or adhere to religious tradition? “Sheffey” was an even bigger undertaking, a lavish and expensive production: Born in 1820, Robert Sheffey was a Methodist evangelist who spent his lifetime taking care of those in need, traveling through Virginia and Tennessee and preaching the word of God. The music for both films was composed by Dwight Gustafson. Born in 1930, Gustafson was named acting dean of the School of Fine Arts at BJU at 24. He served as administrator, taught, composed, conducted and preached until his retirement in 1997. The music for “Flame in the Wind” is based around three themes which recur throughout the score, which was issued on an LP by Unusual Films in 1971. Gustafson wrote a leitmotif for the film’s hero Carlos which is supposed to reveal the pathos and heroism of the young man as he tries to find his way. The second theme, a rather eerie, instrumental melody for the Inquisition expresses the repression and terror for which the inquisitors are responsible, while a triumphant chorale seeks to honor the true believers who have lost their lives due to their faith in Jesus Christ during the Spanish Inquisition. “Sheffey” follows a different musical conception, although Gustafon’s style is unmistakable. Since the film, through the life of Robert Sheffey, tells the story of folk religion, Gustafson decided to employ various folk tunes as seemed appropriate to backbone for his score. Both “Flame in the Wind” and “Sheffey” were composed, orchestrated and conducted by Dwight Gustafson and recorded with the Bob Jones University Symphony Orchestra, composed of students and faculty. LPs of both scores were made available by Unusual Films/BJU to coincide with the film releases. The 35th Caldera CD features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was mastered by Richard Moore and produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed by Dwight Gustafson Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Flame in the Wind 1. Title Music (4:25) 2. The Journey of the Inquisitors (1:59) 3. The Birth of Carlos (2:38) 4. The Monks Escape (2:57) 5. The Dungeon (2:15) 6. The Capture of Carlos (2:38) 7. Processional for the Auto-Da-Fe (3:44) 8. The Tribunal Hall (1:59) 9. The Torture (3:43) 10. The Penitent Returns to Christ (2:47) 11. The Burning of the Martyrs (3:07) Sheffey 12. Title Music (2:03) 13. Disturbance at Revival (1:26) 14. Salvation Hymn (1:35) 15. Young Sheffey in Hills (2:15) 16. Sheffey and Children (0:54) 17. Sheepskin (3:26) 18. Wabash (3:24) 19. Journey in Snow (1:45) 20. Engagement (1:16) 21. The Campground Returns (2:27) 22. Farewell to Gideon (3:54) 23. Tragedy in the Wilderness (2:18) 24. The Campground Burns (3:47) 25. Death of Elizah (2:05) 26. End of the Journey (3:42) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/flame-in-the-wind-dwight-gustafson For more information please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/flame-in-the-windsheffey/gallery/soundtracks/
  7. C6034 Caldera Records is proud to present a selection of Andrew Dickson’s music for Mike Leigh’s films, most notably “Naked” from 1993. Mike Leigh is one of the most revered film-makers in British cinema. Over a span of nearly 50 years, he has garnered 7 Oscar nominations, 14 BAFTA nominations (winning four), a Palme d’Or, a Golden Lion, and countless other prestigious awards. He had already shot “Bleak Moments” and several BBC productions when, in 1981, he met Andrew Dickson. Their collaboration would become one of the most fruitful ones between composers and directors: For “Meantime,” broadcast in 1983, Dickson chose to use a tack piano and a saxophone. The composer has always liked the idea of different instruments representing different people, and piano and saxophone somehow seemed perfect for a film about two brothers in a housing project. His music for “High Hopes” with its prominent use of blues harmonica, recorder, viola and bass won Dickson the European Film Award in 1989 – and deservedly so. But, undoubtedly, their most well-known film is “Naked”, a raw and painful portrait of a young man (played by David Thewlis in a career-defining performance) wandering through London’s night life. “Naked” is a relentless score, driven by a recurring ostinato played on harp. The music is as relentless as the character of Johnny, driving him forward, onward, downward. Like “Naked,” “Secrets & Lies” is in an incredibly rich film, giving Dickson a lot to draw on. His music, composed for strings and brass, is heart-rending and yet far from being sentimental. Andrew Dickson’s music for Mike Leigh’ films has never been released commercially in any format, despite several attempts by various labels. Thanks to the support of both Mike Leigh and Andrew Dickson, we were able to finally license selected cues for this unique compilation, the 34th CD-release of Caldera Records. This world premiere features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was mastered by Richard Moore and produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed by Andrew Dickson Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Meantime 1. End Credits (3:20) High Hopes 2. Suite (11:15) Naked 3. Opening Titles (3:56) 4. Tribal Initiation (0:30) 5. On a Cold, Grim Night (1:49) 6. The Mysteries of His Trade (1:22) 7. The Party’s Over (2:40) 8. Jeremy is Angry (0:44) 9. Friendly Visit (0:44) 10. Brian in the Window (1:31) 11. Sneaking Out (0:56) 12. Taking a Bath (0:39) 13. Blank It All Out (2:38) 14. Johnny Returns Home (0:43) 15. Bad Quartet (1:24) 16. Sandra (0:45) 17. More Heartbreak (0:47) 18. Escape to Nowhere (2:08) 19. End Credits (1:36) Secrets & Lies 20. Opening Credits (0:31) 21. Burial/Wedding Photos (1:52) 22. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (1:46) 23. Maurice and Monica (1:22) 24. I’ll Be Thinking Of You (1:42) 25. A Night Out (1:12) 26. End Credits (2:21) Bonus: 27. Interview with Mike Leigh (6:07) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/naked-andrew-dickson For more information, please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/naked/gallery/soundtracks/
  8. Caldera Records is proud to present Zbigniew Preisner’s score for the motion picture “Lost and Love” from 2015, directed by Sanyuan Peng. “Lost and Love” tells a harrowing (and apparently true) story of loves lost. The love described in the film is the love between parents and their children. Andy Lau plays against type by portraying Lei, a poor fruit-grower. For 15 years, he has been searching for his child, traveling through the vast country in the hope of being united with his offspring. On his way from one end of China to the other, he meets up with a young mechanic who goes by the name of Zeng Shuai as played by Jing Boran. The latter is also searching, although not for his child but for his parents. For her feature film debut, Sanyuan Peng chose Zbigniew Preisner as composer who wrote one of his very best works, a delicate and yet passionate score which is rich in themes and variations. Its most prominent theme is – fittingly – a lullaby which opens the album. It is a melody which recurs throughout the score in different metamorphoses. Not only did it fit the images on screen, it also captured the overall topic of the film. The main theme, as already briefly laid out in the prominent lullaby, can be heard most prominently in “Lost and Love – Main Theme”, carried by strings, while echoes of it feature in “Retrospective”. It is reincarnated in a variation for flute, guitar, harp and orchestra in the “End Credits”, which offer a glimpse of hope to the characters in the film and therefore the audience when it is given a passionate coda. The 33rd CD-release of Caldera Records – a world premiere – features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was mastered by Leszek Kaminski and produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed by Zbigniew Preisner Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Lost and Love 1. Lullaby (1:44) 2. The Beginning of the Story (1:07) 3. Missing (0:55) 4. On the Journey (2:02) 5. Friendship (2:55) 6. Memories from Youth (3:23) 7. Woman in the Rain (1:11) 8. Retrospective (0:55) 9. False Hope (2:01) 10. Lost and Love – Main Theme (1:04) 11. Last Hope (1:39) 12. Dinner (0:51) 13. First Bridge (0:48) 14. Swathe I (0:34) 15. Village (1:40) 16. Dreams (1:01) 17. Swathe II (1:00) 18. Night (2:27) 19. Bus Stop (3:09) 20. Flashback (5:47) 21. Lost and Love – Main Theme II (0:59) 22. Lady’s Death (3:51) 23. Lullaby II (1:41) 24. In the Car (2:31) 25. Lost and Love – Main Theme III (2:40) 26. End Credits (2:49) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/lost-and-love-zbigniew-preisner For more information, please visit our homepage: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/lost-and-love/gallery/soundtracks/
  9. Caldera Records is proud to present Gerald Fried’s Oscar-nominated score for the motion picture “Birds Do It, Bees Do It” from 1974, directed by Nicolas Noxon and Irwin Rosten. Narrated by Lee Bergere, a beloved actor who had guest roles in every major television series in the 60s (including “Star Trek”), “Birds Do It, Bees Do It” examines the reproductive habits of bacteria, frogs, lions, kangaroos, elephants, monkeys, birds, rhinos, and others by showing in graphic detail how animals behave before, during and after sexual intercourse. The documentary did not shy away from its sensitive topic. Instead, it discussed sex as a natural part of life and aimed to educate its viewers. In fact, several college campuses decided to show the film to its students in the mid-70s, using the moving images of copulating animals as an educational tool. Fried had already worked on a number of Wolper productions when he was offered to score the documentary. It would be one of the most satisfying experiences of his career. Not only was he not subjected to a hair-rising deadline, he also had sufficient funds to execute his creative vision. When he saw the rough cut for the first time, the germ of an idea evolved – human beings portrayed in the film would musically be treated with tonal themes (Man Intrudes), while animals would get less organized, less thematic, but nonetheless tonal music (Kangaroos). Insects would be portrayed with electronic music and/or percussion instruments (Talking Insects), amoebas only with noises produced by synthesizers (Primal Ooze). In 1976, “Birds Do It, Bees Do It” received an Oscar nomination for Best Dramatic Score. It failed to win, but Gerald Fried’s glorious music for Birds Do It, Bees Do It stands the test of time and is not only one of Fried’s very best scores but also one of the best scores ever written for a documentary. The 32nd CD-release of Caldera Records – a world premiere – features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was mastered by Richard Moore and produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed and Conducted by Gerald Fried Album Produced by Stephan Eicke, Jim Lochner Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Birds Do It, Bees Do It 1. Flowers Opening (0:58) 2. Flowers Growing (1:27) 3. Lizards (3:04) 4. Rattlesnake (1:02) 5. Buffalo Birth (3:09) 6. Maggots Eating Mouse (2:10) 7. Elephants and Lions (3:49) 8. Fight Aftermath/Growth of Pepsis/Wasp Embryo (1:53) 9. Frog Mating (1:13) 10. Talking Insects (3:08) 11. Chimp Lullaby (1:19) 12. Aphids (1:02) 13. Kangaroos (4:47) 14. Man Intrudes (1:43) 15. Trout (0:52) 16. Flirting Trout (1:37) 17. Trout Eggs (1:05) 18. Snails (2:34) 19. Cheetah Chase (0:54) 20. Artificial Insemination (1:03) 21. Primal Ooze (2:16) 22. Tarantula/Pepsis Wasp Fight (1:23) 23. Wasps (0:56) 24. Assorted Pickups (3:17) 25. Waltz of the Grebes (2:43) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/birds-do-it-bees-do-it-gerald-fried
  10. Doch, ein eBook wird mit der Print-Ausgabe angeboten: eISBN: 978-1-4766-3700-6 Das eBook ist nicht auf der Verlagsseite direkt erhältlich, aber zeitgleich zur Buchversion auf den gängigen eBook-Seiten.
  11. Verzeihung - es geht natürlich auch über Amazon.de :) https://www.amazon.de/Struggle-Behind-Soundtrack-Discordant-Scoring/dp/1476676313/ Ich entschuldige mich wegen des hohen Preises. Der stand leider nicht in meiner Macht.
  12. Admittedly, it's not a Caldera release, but it's glorious regardless; and it's about film music - yay! In August, my book 'The Struggle Behind the Soundtrack' will be published in the US. Its aim is to examine the current working conditions for composers in film and television - in Hollywood and beyond. How have temp tracks and digital editing influenced their work? Is it still possible to deploy long, sustained melodies in modern blockbusters? How has orchestration and ghost writing changed over the decades? (And who employs ghost writers? Is it just everybody?) Part of the book includes an in-depth analysis of Hans Zimmer's Remote Control Productions and the influence he has had not only on film music. For the first time ever, the set-up of Zimmer's company is examined via in-depth interviews with assistants, interns, programmers and co-composers. In essence, the book should (hopefully) answer the question of how we got where we are now in film music by covering the effects of temp tracks, digital editing, companies such as Cutting Edge, elaborate sound design, and much more. Although it is not a collection of interviews, I did interview over three dozen of composers, editors and sound designers such as Angelo Badalamenti, Klaus Badelt, Lorne Balfe, Marco Beltrami, Bruce Broughton, Carter Burwell, Mychael Danna, George Fenton, Murray Gold, Henry Jackman, Abel Korzeniowski, David Lynch, Walter Murch, John Ottman, Rachel Portman, Alan Silvestri, Randy Thom and Christopher Young. They are quoted in the book. Here is a link to my publisher's homepage: https://mcfarlandbooks.com/product/the-struggle-behind-the-soundtrack/ And amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Struggle-Behind-Soundtrack-Discordant-Scoring/dp/1476676313/ And unfortunately I had to set up a Twitter profile, so follow me for some nuggets: https://twitter.com/EickeStephan (If you find some grammatical errors and spelling mistakes in this post, don't you worry - my book was proofread by several native speakers.) I hope my book can clear up some misunderstandings about the current film music landscape, answer some questions and provide brilliant entertainment of the highest order. It's not an academic book with fancy language, rest assured. I don't like those myself.
  13. Caldera Records is proud to present the score for the motion picture “Ambition” from 1991, directed by Scott Goldstein, featuring music by Leonard Rosenman. Actor and writer Lou Diamond Phillips developed a story about an aspiring writer who has trouble finding a job, and has to support himself – as most aspiring writers do – by working odd jobs. His character Mitchell Osgood runs a bookstore when one day he stumbles across a potentially interesting story. If he can investigate and write it down, so Mitchell thinks, it could be his big break as a journalist. The subject of his investigation is a man named Albert Merrick, a serial killer who is up for parole. Who is this man, Mitchell wonders, and what motivated him to commit the awful crimes he was sentenced for? One of the stars of the film is, undoubtedly, a man behind the scenes: Leonard Rosenman. It was clear to Rosenman and Scott Goldstein that the score should have a progressive, rather than conventional harmonic structure. They agreed that this would help to underscore Merrick’s (the antagonist) horrific, troubling visions and this approach would help capture his state of mind musically. Goldstein suggested Rosenman play him some of his concert music as a blueprint for “Ambition”. Encouraged to be able to draw upon his “progressive” work for the concert stage, Rosenman presented Goldstein with “Foci”, a work for chamber orchestra that the composer had written in 1981 and revised in 1983. Goldstein loved what he heard and commenced to use “Foci” as temp music for “Ambition”. “Foci” is an atonal piece, complex and full of anxiety – exactly what Goldstein needed for his motion picture. The 31st CD-release of Caldera Records – a world premiere – features a detailed booklet-text by Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed and Conducted by Leonard Rosenman Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke Ambition 1. Main Titles (3:23) 2. A New Project (1:31) 3. A Sleepless Night (1:40) 4. Albert Merrick (0:27) 5. The Worst Nightmare of the Day (1:48) 6. Confrontation (1:24) 7. What Makes Him Tick? (1:01) 8. Visions (0:41) 9. Room 301 (1:51) 10. Brave and Brutal (1:02) 11. A Good Friend of Mine (0:37) 12. Cancer, Psychosis, Anything (0:49) 13. Does It Hurt? (1:22) 14. A Matter of Timing (1:40) 15. Where is Mitchell? (0:45) 16. Cat and Mouse (2:02) 17. On Knife’s Edge (1:20) 18. Help Me Out (3:35) 19. On a Sinister Mission (1:26) 20. Jordan (1:04) 21. A Tasty Drug (0:54) 22. Against the Clock (4:12) 23. The Final Duel (0:55) 24. End Credits (3:51) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/ambition-leonard-rosenman For more information please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/ambition/
  14. C6030 Caldera Records is proud to present the score for the motion picture “The History of Eternity” from 2014, directed by Camilo Cavalcante, featuring music by Zbigniew Preisner. The History of Eternity tells of not one, but three love stories. The focus is on three women: one of them is a teenager (Débora Ingrid), the second one is in her 40s (Marcélia Cartaxo) while the last one is in her 60s (Zezita Matos). The male cast consists of Bahian musician Léo França playing a blind accordion player. Irandhir Santos portraying a Sertanejo artist suffering from epilepsy. Claudius Jaborandy offers a counterpoint to these artists as a rather pragmatic man more concerned with material goods. The three stories happen simultaneously and intertwine, but are given separate titles: Chicken Foot, Goat Foot and Urubu Foot. Since two of the three main characters play musicians (and one of them is a musician in real life), it’s only natural that music becomes an integral part of the story. Preisner provided music that Cavalcante described as something that lent some Eastern European melancholy to the film. One of the key ideas of the score is using the guitar, which actually ties in together with the story and the usage of songs in the narrative. There is a very strong culture of so-called “Sertanejo” music which could be best described in terms of how country music is regarded in the United States. The score was awarded the Cinema Brazil Grand Prize, the Brazilian Oscar. The 30th CD-release of Caldera Records features a detailed booklet-text by Gergely Hubai and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas. The CD was produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed by Zbigniew Preisner Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke The History of Eternity 1. Main Theme (4:07) 2. Goodbye (1:52) 3. Funeral (2:00) 4. The Call (1:42) 5. Absence (1:19) 6. Quarantine (1:18) 7. Sunrise (1:44) 8. Moonrise (3:47) 9. Water (1:34) 10. The Hunt (2:39) 11. Re-Discover (2:43) 12. Rain I (2:03) 13. Sad Heart (2:52) 14. Another Day (0:39) 15. Rain II (0:46) 16. Arrival Song (0:42) 17. The Sea (1:30) 18. Desire (3:05) 19. The Journey (2:49) 20. Memories (1:10) 21. Main Theme – Version II (1:12) 22. Passion (3:42) 23. Timeless (2:50) 24. End Credits (4:10) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/the-history-of-eternity-zbigniew-preisner For more information please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/the-history-of-eternity/gallery/soundtracks/
  15. C6029 Caldera Records is proud to present the score for the motion picture “The Baby” from 1973, directed by Ted Post, featuring music by Gerald Fried. The motion picture, marketed as a horror film, tells the story of a dedicated social worker takes on a case involving a grown-up man still in diapers. It doesn’t take long for the disturbed social worker to figure out that ‘Baby’s’ family deliberately keeps the retarded man-child from maturing. There are even more disturbing facts to note: the disappearance of previous social worker being the most unsettling. But lo and behold, the new social worker finds herself confronted with the ‘Baby’s’ family who, so it seems, is out to silence her. Gerald Fried’s music provides a phonic reminder that things may not be as presented; a harmonic harbinger of hidden dread. Fried’s resonantly descriptive dissertation is centered around a somber and melancholy etude, offered first in cello solo (performed by the esteemed Edgar Lustgarten), and expanded into a dreamlike lullaby, which sustains the film’s emotional capital throughout. This forlorn, needful melody acts as a guiding constant with the netherworld atmosphere created by Gerald Fried’s eerily sublime orchestration – a creepy and unsettling realm of threatening rattles, hypnotic chimes, and nightmarish music box tinkling. The 29th CD-release of Caldera Records features a detailed booklet-text by David Fuller and Stephan Eicke and elegant artwork by Luis Miguel Rojas as well as an exclusive audio commentary by Gerald Fried. The CD was produced by Stephan Eicke and John Elborg. Music Composed and Conducted by Gerald Fried Album Produced by Stephan Eicke Executive Producers for Caldera Records: John Elborg, Stephan Eicke The Baby 1. Main Title (2:49) 2. Meet the Baby (0:37) 3. Sitter (0:54) 4. Evil Eye (0:55) 5. Hatchet Wielders (0:37) 6. Slides (1:39) 7. Maloche (0:30) 8. Germaine (1:06) 9. Anne’s Closeup (0:53) 10. Ruth Complains (0:32) 11. Anne and Baby Gone (1:17) 12. Baby Dressed Older (1:11) 13. Night Approach (2:28) 14. See You in Court (0:57) 15. Knife Job (0:44) 16. Sneak Racy/DOA (6:30) 17. Second Hatchet (0:39) 18. Excavation (1:44) 19. Pool Games (1:41) 20. The Baby (Guitar) (1:49) 21. The Baby (Piano) (3:51) 22. Party Music (2:52) 23. Dance Music (4:32) 24. Dennis (4:39) Bonus: 25. Audio Commentary by Gerald Fried (7:14) Listen to a 5 min clip here: https://soundcloud.com/alderaecords/the-baby-gerald-fried For more information, please visit: http://caldera-records.com/portfolio/the-baby/gallery/soundtracks/
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