Jump to content
Soundtrack Board

Empfohlene Beiträge

Interessanter Artikel über Ghostwriting in Hollywood. Das deckt sich eins zu eins mit dem, was ich von Bekanntschaften in L.A. gehört habe. Die haben keine besonders hohe Meinung von Zimmer, Elfman & Co.

 

https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2022/02/the-ugly-truth-of-how-movie-scores-are-made?fbclid=IwAR0zpX-3eDjSvuUZIbg8zpbzvS-hiSFlyX8-JnIj6Ozwg-VssQPncSxYfQw

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Wirklich sehr schöner, ausführlicher Artikel. Zeigt auch schön, wie verkorkst Hollywood alleine in der Sparte ist. Wobei ich es auch im Endeffekt verstehen kann; jeder muss irgendwie an seine Kohle kommen, erst Recht wenn er so schlau war, sich im Voraus Unmengen an materialistischen Gütern angehäuft hat.

Ich bin selber momentan in einer ironischen Situation in der Composer seine Serienmusik grob umschreibt, sie dann an additional composer abgibt, die wegen zu wenig Zeit ghostwriter an Bord holen, für die ich wiederum aushelfe. Krank, fast schon lachhaft. 

Die Sache mit den 279 Leuten bei Remote ist nicht so ganz korrekt; auf der angedeuteten Website sind lediglich alle Mitarbeiter verzeichnet, die seit den 90ern mit Zimmer und co. in Verbindung waren. Aber dafür stimmt der Satz "If Zimmer can’t get a cue right, one composer told me, “he has 60 people behind him willing to give it a shot”" umso mehr. Es sind nach wie vor unglaublich viele.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Hier ist ein kurzer Auszug aus meinem Buch, "The Struggle Behind the Soundtrack", der etwas mehr in die Tiefe geht:

The days are long gone when one director or one producer was in charge of musical decisions. Now there are countless different producers and decision-makers who attempt to guarantee that a movie, with all its ingredients, is marketable. As Bruce Broughton puts it: “In the last few years, they have wanted it fast and cheap. Because of the schedules and all the silly previews, they make the composer rewrite cues several times for no reason at all. This has made it economically difficult for composers and nearly impossible to work on their own. Today, I would go home, start to write and then I would have to put it into the synthesizer. Somebody would then send the file to the producers or director and I would have to wait for their notes. Then I would send the new file of rewritten cues and they would send their new notes. I'd be working endlessly just to get ten minutes of music done. I would need somebody else to help. Nobody is on salary nowadays and very few are getting a fee. They are working from a 'package'. They get a music budget to pay for all the expenses themselves. Some guys do very well with that. Others are terrible with that. It is a very difficult time. I don't think it is a happy time.”

Producers and directors expect the composer to work as quickly as the quickest person in town, never mind how many assistants it is necessary to employ to get the job done. This increased pressure in the industry has lead composers who value working on their own, rather than relying on a team of arrangers, interns, assistants and orchestrators, to reject offers that would require them to work as the head of a team to get the job done in time. As Rachel Portman admits: “It is really sad – or not. It probably isn't when you are a young composer trying to get in. I think it can help them if they get a break. It's not something I am interested in doing, really. I have been quite purist about it. When I have been offered projects where I know I would have to have a number two composer underneath me for me to do it, I turn them down. I want to write music that is bespoke. All of it. When I did Used People and Benny and Joon I orchestrated every note of it. I loved it. I am not interested in handing things over. That's not me.”

Bruce Broughton recounts a rather amusing anecdote about a director's expectations: “Years ago, a director came over to my house. At that time I had a piano in the room where I was working. I had some synthesizers in another room. He came into my piano room, looked around and said, 'Is this your stuff?' I said, 'My stuff? Yes, this is what I write on.' Then I understood what he was talking about. He expected to come in and see what a lot of composers were getting in these days, all the hardware. So I had to show him 'my stuff'. Well, I have now heard: 'Where is your team?' They expect you to show up with other people. If you just come up with yourself that's very old-fashioned. Do you still write with a pencil? Do you ride on a horse and buggy? Do you have color photographs or just black and white? They expect you to have a team. Everybody has their team.”
Are most directors and producers aware of the fact that the composer they commission works in a team rather than writing everything themselves? Not necessarily, as one composer and arranger, who wishes to remain anonymous, says: “I don't think many producers and directors know about the extent of composers farming out work. Composers make sure that their clients never interface with the people who are actually writing the music. Especially in the context of television series, producers must be aware that the composer they are hiring is already working on five or six other shows. It's easy to look up that information on IMDb. Yet, they seem to be convinced that the composer alone is going to have enough time to address their every need, while simultaneously working on five other shows and maybe also on two features and a video game. Occasionally, you hear a story of a director asking a composer to not employ ghostwriters on a specific project, but that seems to be rare. In most cases, composers are scared of their clients finding out that someone else has been writing their music, and the arrangers are scared of telling the truth, in fear of never again finding work in an industry that will shun them.”

Yet Broughton argues that today's producers are more ready to accept the idea that they also hire the composer's team when they hire a composer. “They may not think about what the team does though. What the team does varies from composer to composer. What happens as well is that after you presented the score, the producers or director decide to use the score in a completely different manner and they rearrange the whole score on the stage. Is that ghostwriting? As a composer, you can never be sure how your score gets into the film. I'm under the impression that people are now used to seeing the composers' team. You walk on the stage and you have at least an orchestrator there, likely a technician running clicks, likely some software or hardware programmer. There are video monitors everywhere, running all kinds of software all at once. It's obvious that the composer is coming in with a team. Who did what, I don't know. The producers and directors care about the name of the person they hired.”

Matthew Margeson has had a slightly different experience as a composer in Hollywood, which leads him to assume that producers and directors are now very well aware of the fact that only few A-list composers in town are writing everything themselves: “Especially in the studio system no one is oblivious to that any more. Directors and the heads of the studios know that it's a team effort and that there are maybe some young composers that are just trying to make their way. It's a beautiful thing because it's giving a lot of young people a chance, and because everyone is aware that it happens maybe the need from the composers perspective to hide isn't as great as it once was.”

Yet the revelation that a composer's work was partially written by ghostwriters may not only anger directors and producers, it can also be disillusioning for young composers who grew up as fans of film music. Admits John Ottman: “The whole factory mentality is still weird to me. When I first started I was like, 'Wow, how can a composer go into a meeting and people know that other people are writing for him?' Now people just know it and they accept it. As a composer you are now seen as sort of a director. They are basically an architect or a contractor who has his workers around. We know when that whole factory mentality started. It was just so in the face that everybody just accepted it. To me it's still weird. But I'm an old fart. Now it's necessary for composers. Even if it's just a few cues, you got to have some help.”

[...]

Ghostwriter are always at the mercy of their employer. Whether an arranger/ghostwriter will receive credit or royalties depends on several factors, as John Ottman explains how he approaches paying his staff: “Everyone is treated the same. But I don't have a massive team. It all comes down to the project, whether I am paid well or not, and how much I am paying this person as well. I feel horrible subjecting anybody to writing ghost music. I know how agonizing it is to write music. I almost feel terrible when asking anyone to do it. I pay really well upfront because I feel bad. Then I put them through hell. I don't think any writer writes a cue for me less than ten times, sometimes more than that. So I pay them a lot because of the hell I put them through. It really depends on the project. Then I treat everyone the same. On Non-Stop, Edwin Wendler wrote a lot. That was a different situation. When I work with people, they do a couple of cues. But Edwin wrote the music for a couple of reels because I was busy doing Days of Future Past. I had written three reels of Non-Stop before I had to go to Montreal, so Edwin worked with me on a couple of reels. I am not going to hide it that someone helps me out so much.”

Matthew Margeson makes the payment for his arrangers and ghostwriters dependent on the actual work they contribute, something which differs from project to project. As he elaborates: “I like to keep it a very static system. If I have written a piece of music, fully orchestrated it myself and I then get an updated version of the film three weeks later where they removed 30 seconds of that scene, I won't have time to adjust that music accordingly. So I may have someone come to my studio in the middle of the night and remove that 30 seconds and musically connect the tissue, so it still sounds like a piece of music. That may be a lightly less of a creative job than me sketching out a piece and having someone else orchestrate it. I take all this in consideration when giving out the royalties. […] There are definitely composers that I worked for who will say, 'This is something that I can't give any royalties out for,' or, 'I need you to do this under the radar.' I think that in some cases, in their defense, that may be it's the first time they work for a specific studio or a director and they do want to keep that relationship with that director close and not let them through the smoke and mirrors completely.”

[...]

The set-up of Hans Zimmer's studios is explained by Matthew Margeson who started his career with Zimmer before venturing out on his own and writing the music for productions such as Eddie the Eagle and Kingsman: The Golden Circle: “When I was working for guys like Klaus [Badelt] and Jim Dooley, it was just an employer/employee relationship. I was brought on and paid as an assistant. As long as you didn't mess up too bad and you got the job done in time you were welcome to stay. In a lot of the composers' suites, not only at Remote Control, there is maybe a writing room for the composer and then an assistants' room which may have a smaller set up in it, or a place for you to do administrative tasks. But then of course when the composer leaves at the end of the day, that's a lot of the time when my job would start. I would then go into the writing suite and clean up what he was doing as far as backing up things, or finishing arrangements, or uploading a finished cue to the server, or emailing it to a director, or doing the preparations for the next day.”

When working with a team on a film score it is essential to make each piece of music fit homogeneously into the overall sound of the score, rather than having a mixture of styles and different approaches by the various composers contributing to the project. Nothing is more irritating than a patchwork score which actually sounds like a patchwork.

The approach to resolving this potential problem is elaborate, as explained by C., a former assistant at Remote Control who wishes to remain anonymous. At the beginning of each project, Zimmer has a meeting not only with the director of the movie and perhaps some of the producers, but also with the composers who will contribute to the score, as well as a music editor and possibly some assistants – a group of not more than ten to fifteen people overall: “In a production meeting, the division of work is being scheduled. As a composer, after you return from the meeting and go back into your studio, there are already several messages on your computer with detailed notes about the production which was just talked about a few minutes ago. The work flow is absolutely amazing and necessary. It is incredibly quick and one meeting is not enough for that.”

Indeed, in the course of the production of the score for a movie there will be several meetings at regular intervals, as C. continues: “Even when Hans is mentioned as the main composer on a project, the director talks to all composers involved in the team during a production meeting. As the music is being presented in a meeting this makes sense. At the end of a production such a meeting is likely to be held every day, or at least every other day. Sometimes Hans asks a question during the meetings and sometimes you do better not to answer. Because sometimes he just wants to have your skills proofed.”

The amount of music Zimmer writes himself varies from film to film, but the process itself is always the same, with Zimmer exploring new, unusual sounds as the composer explained: “Before writing a single note, my team and I spend a lot of time programming new sounds, sampling new instruments. [...] The moment I start writing, I start mixing. Since I don't write on paper, I spend a long time making each note and sound convey the right emotion. It helps later with the live musicians. I can be very specific in my language (and I use English, not Italian) to convey to them why I want a note or phrase played a certain way. I don't make changes on the scoring stage, I don't let directors make changes with the musicians there. The recording is about getting a performance, not re-writing the cue. Nothing sounds worse than a bunch of bored musicians that had to wait while someone's changed an arrangement.”

After programming new sounds Zimmer writes a suite of music for the movie. C. elaborates: “This suite is based on his talks with the director and the musical ideas he got from them. The vision is his. Of course, he asks for opinions from people at Remote Control, but the overall concept is his and his alone. Some composers who worked for Hans were not able to deal with the stress. You can't solve problems with logic. You need to solve them psychologically to be able to survive there.”

After each production meeting the composers who have been assigned to write parts of the score retreat to their individual studios and work on their cues, which are based on the themes by Zimmer. To be able to work as efficiently as possible in a team, Remote Control has its own internal server. During the night, everything that had been written during the day is synced to all the computers so that every composer has the same data available when they come into the studio the next morning. Every composer not only has all the music written by every other composer, but also has all the materials created, such as virtual instruments and samples. There are people working at Remote Control whose job is to build virtual instruments, manage the samples and ensure this content is available to the composers.

With this way of working, every new production has a set of new sounds, ensuring that each project is distinctive. As elaborate as this technology is, it can cause problems, as recounted by C. in a rather amusing anecdote: “One night, I was in charge of the back up. But I needed some material from the computer which I wanted to put on my private hard drive. I put my hard drive in and pulled it out again afterward. Or I thought it had been my hard drive. As soon as I had pulled it out, an error message of the sync software appeared on my computer, saying that the back up could not be completed. I looked at other computers in the studio as well and found that the message appeared on every single one of them. I had pulled out the wrong drive! This meant that every computer had a different amount of material. I panicked. I then had to do a night shift to repair the damage by walking into every studio and checking every computer to see what the individual status was and if any material had been damaged.”


The Struggle Behind the Soundtrack - Amazon

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Wie ist das eigentlich mittlerweile bei Beltrami? Beschäftigt der auch noch ungenannte Ghostwriter, oder machen das mittlerweile nur noch die genannten - und etablierten - Leute seines Teams (Trumpp, Torjussen, Roberts, Drubich, etc.)?

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Lukas Kendall, der den Artikel drüben bei FSM gestern verbreitet hat, sagt es dort ganz treffend:

Zitat

I don’t love contemporary film music the way I did even in the 1990s—in fact, I don’t even like it. I kind of can’t stand most of it. There are all sorts of aesthetic reasons why—but it’s quite likely a major reason that it’s simply not “written” anymore.

Gerade TV-Musik ist doch oft in der Regel nur noch eine Art von Sounddesign. Ob man jetzt hier sonntags den Tatort einschaltet oder neue Serien aus Hollywood im Streaming schaut. Das muss doch für die jungen Komponisten zusätzlich frustrierend sein, wenn man kaum die Möglichkeit hat, auch mal richtig im traditionellen Sinn. komponieren zu können.

Ich habe z.B. gerade die neue Miniserie Dexter: New Blood gesehen. Von "Underscore" konnte man da kaum reden, musikalisch interessant wurde es nur, wenn es für ein paar Sekunden Anklänge an die Scores des leider schon verstorbenen Daniel Licht zur Vorgängerserie gab. Das ausgezeichnete Thema von Rolfe Kent haben sie mit dem Verzicht auf einen Vorspann natürlich ganz gekippt. Aber immerhin wird Licht in den End Credits genannt, wo ein neues Arrangement seiner Abspannmusik zu hören ist.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich habe mir schon lange gedacht, dass "Komponieren" (sage ich jetzt mal als simplen Überbegriff für vieles) genau so abgeht wie die Arbeit an einem Heftroman. Viele Heftromanautoren, die unter Verlagspseudonym arbeiten, bekommen vom Verlagsredakteur eine Idee. Nun setzt sich der Autor daran, eine Geschichte aus dieser Idee zu definieren. Ob die Idee am Anfang, in der Mitte, oder am Ende erwähnt wird ist egal. Hauptsache die Idee kommt im Roman vor. Der Autor schreibt dann ein Exposé und eine weitere Ausarbeitung des Exposés, definiert die Kapitel, usw. Ist der Roman fertig, wird er abgegeben und es kann passieren, dass der Redakteur diverse Sätze, Namen und womöglich ein komplettes Kapitel radikal verändert.

Heißt letztlich: Diverse Heftromanautoren arbeiten NUR als Verlagspseudonym. Oder wenn sie die Ehre erhielten eine Autorenreihe zu bekommen, heuern manche Autoren hin und wieder Ghostwriter an. Und wenn es nur für Exposés sind. Also sind quasi drei Personen schriftstellerisch an einem Werk beteiligt, aber nur einer wird erwähnt. Und letzteres womöglich nicht unter dem eigenen Namen, sondern als Verlagspseudonym.

Ich dachte mir daher schon immer folgendes: Wenn ein Soundtrack vor 15 Jahren auf CD erschien und in der Gegenwart als Expanded Version erscheint, blieben dann so manche Tracks im Originalalbum deswegen unveröffentlicht, weil in denen der Ghostwriter stärker aktiv war? Also der Hauptkomponist das Originalalbum nur aus dem Grund so freigegeben hat, da dort Tracks enthalten sind, die ER / SIE komponierte? Sind es womöglich gar keine "dramaturgische" Entscheidungen, welche Musikstücke ein schönes Höralbum ergeben?

Es gibt ja immer wieder unter Sammlern und Hörern die Meinung bei expandierten Versionen: "...och, man hätte die 12 Minuten Material auch weg lassen können. So viel Neues ist da jetzt nicht zu hören...". Sind diese 12 Minuten womöglich deswegen unspektakulär und klingen nicht so bunt wie der Rest, da es reines Underscoring ist vom Ghostwriter, der jetzt nicht so den Stil besitzt wie der Hauptkomponist?

Ich habe ein paar Soundtracks von Joel Goldsmith in der Sammlung. Ich will nichts unterstellen, aber entweder konnte Joel seinen Vater an manchen Stellen super kopieren / studierte seine Arbeiten, oder aber hat Jerry die ein oder andere Melodie kurzerhand beigesteuert. Hin und wieder hat Jerry für seinen Sohn dirigiert, z.B. bei SHILOH. Mich würde es nicht wundern, wenn er als Dirigent da mehr Einfluß nahm auf manche Töne, als er hätte dürfen. Quasi nach dem Motto "Let´s play this..." und hat dann ein paar handschriftliche Sketches für 60 Sekunden Musik unter den Musikern verteilt. Könnte ich mir gut vorstellen.

Wiederum können sich Künstler untereinander auch kreativ ergänzen und den Horizont erweitern. Aber dann sollte jeder auch in den Credits erwähnt werden. Bei Hans Zimmer weiß ich nie, ob diese eine megatolle Melodie auf der CD nun von ihm stammt, oder da der Co-Componist für verantwortlich zeichnet?!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Große A-List Komponisten sind mittlerweile einfach eine Firma wie jede andere auch. Wenn man sich heute irgendeine Software kauft, weiß man auch nicht, wer jetzt welche Teile programmiert hat. Es läuft dann einfach unter dem Namen Apple oder Microsoft. Dass das nun mittlerweile auch in kreativen Berufen ähnlich läuft ist bedauerlich. Musik ist mittlerweile nur noch ein Produkt, dass an den Mann gebracht werden soll bzw. Im Falle von Soundtracks ein Teil eines Produkts. Aber gerade kreative Menschen entscheiden sich ja häufig für den Beruf des Komponisten, Grafikdesigners etc. um sich künstlerisch auszuleben. Dies ist in einem solchen Umfeld nur noch für wenige Menschen möglich…

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Seit Monaten erstelle ich aus meinen CDs in der Sammlung MP3s. Gerade habe ich das Booklet von Joel Goldsmiths THE UNTOUCHABLES in der Hand. Klar, dass sein Vater Jerry auch hier den Pilotfilm dirigiert hat. Ich hatte einst bei Kauf der CD das Booklet nur überflogen und gerade für mich neu gelesen: "As it turned out, Jerry came in to conduct the orchestra for the main title, as well as a few cues in the pilot."

Im Booklet wird er aber "nur" als Conductor erwähnt, nicht jedoch als Co-Composer. Für mich nichts anderes als ein Ghostwriter für einige Szenen. Da man nicht weiß, um welche cues es sich handelt unterstelle ich mal, dass Jerry nicht unbedingt die lustlosesten Dialogszenen komponierte, sondern die ein oder andere dramatische, romantische, oder gar Actionsequenz. 

Ich muss mal in die CD1 bei Gelegenheit "reinhören", ob man Jerry "raushört".

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Dass Elfman trotz allem immer noch einer der „good guys" ist, wie Deborah Lurie sagt, wundert mich nicht. Das kommt vielleicht auch daher, dass Elfman sich quasi als Musiker hochgearbeitet hat. Von den Tagen der Musiktheatergruppe The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo, über die daraus entstehende Band Oingo Boingo, bis hin zu seinen Filmmusiken war Elfman da immer mit viel Elan dabei. Und ist bis heute ein streitbarer Geist geblieben, der sich auch mal wehrt, wenn Dinge falsch laufen, siehe SPIDER-MAN 2. In einem alten Interview sagte sein Orchestrator Steve Bartek einmal, dass es in einem Elfman-Score keine Note gäbe, die nicht von Elfman wäre. Das bezog sich auf die Arbeit der Orchestratoren und dass beide, Elfman und Bartek, mit verschiedenen Orchestratoren nicht mehr arbeiten würden, da diese gerne mal beim Orchestrieren den Score „verbessern" wollten.

Diese Zeiten sind natürlich schon lange vorbei. Auch Elfman kann einen Score für einen Multi-Millionen-Dollar-Blockbuster nicht mehr alleine stemmen. Und will das vielleicht auch gar nicht mehr. Wie oben schon von Stese beschrieben, habe ich auch bei Elfman schon lange das Gefühl, dass er für seine „großen" Scores ordentlich Arbeit an andere abgibt. Einfach deshalb, weil sie in weiten Teilen oftmals gar nicht mehr so stark nach ihm klingen, wie das noch früher der Fall war. Chris Bacon wird ja schon seit Jahren bei den großen Elfman-Scores als „additional composer" gelistet, ebenso TJ Lindgren. An Sachen wie GOOSEBUMPS dürften beide locker 50% beteiligt sein. Ich glaube kaum, dass Elfman da viel mehr als Themen und rohe Skizzen geschrieben hat.

Aber Elfman war da eigentlich immer recht offen, wenn weitere Komponisten beteiligt waren. Das ging ja schon recht früh in seiner Karriere los mit Jonathan Sheffer beispielsweise, der einen Cue für DARKMAN schrieb. Daher glaube ich schon, dass es einfach Elfmans Art ist, recht offen damit umzugehen und den Leuten, die für ihn arbeiten, den Rücken zu stärken. Ist vielleicht auch einfach die rebellische Rocker-Attitüde. :D

John Williams ist da natürlich eine Ausnahme. Aber außer für Spielberg und STAR WARS arbeitet er ja auch an keinen anderen Filmprojekten mehr, grob gesagt. Er hat sich den Status erarbeitet, sich aussuchen zu können, an was und mit wem er arbeitet. Doch selbst bei Mitstreitern, bei denen er eigentlich gewohnt war, musikalisch gut aufgehoben zu sein, hat er ja negative Erfahrungen machen müssen. Beispiele dafür sind die STAR-WARS-Prequels, bei denen seine Musik stellenweise schon stark durch den Fleischwolf gedreht und neu zusammengesetzt wurde. Das will er sich sicherlich nicht antun wollen und die Produzenten teurer Filme wollen sicherlich auch keinen Score mehr, der so „kompliziert" ist, dass man ihn nur schwer auseinanderschneiden und neu zusammensetzen kann. Deshalb läuft es ja oftmals auf reines Sound Design oder sich wiederholende Akkorde hinaus, weil man das einfach besser schneiden kann, wenn die Szene zum fünfzigsten Mal geändert wird. ;)

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Am 22.2.2022 um 15:32 schrieb Alexander Grodzinski:

Auch Elfman kann einen Score für einen Multi-Millionen-Dollar-Blockbuster nicht mehr alleine stemmen. Und will das vielleicht auch gar nicht mehr. Wie oben schon von Stese beschrieben, habe ich auch bei Elfman schon lange das Gefühl, dass er für seine „großen" Scores ordentlich Arbeit an andere abgibt. Einfach deshalb, weil sie in weiten Teilen oftmals gar nicht mehr so stark nach ihm klingen, wie das noch früher der Fall war. Chris Bacon wird ja schon seit Jahren bei den großen Elfman-Scores als „additional composer" gelistet, ebenso TJ Lindgren. An Sachen wie GOOSEBUMPS dürften beide locker 50% beteiligt sein. Ich glaube kaum, dass Elfman da viel mehr als Themen und rohe Skizzen geschrieben hat.

Da stimme ich 100%-ig zu. Der letzte großartige Elfman-score ist schon über ein Jahrzehnt her. Mittlerweile macht er anscheinend lieber Solo-Alben als Filmmusik. 

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 59 Minuten schrieb Zimson:

Da stimme ich 100%-ig zu. Der letzte großartige Elfman-score ist schon über ein Jahrzehnt her. Mittlerweile macht er anscheinend lieber Solo-Alben als Filmmusik. 

 

Die großen Filme macht er wohl nur noch, damit weiter Kohle reinkommt. Aber sein Herz hängt da, glaube ich, schon lange nicht mehr dran. Geht ja auch schwer, wenn man so, wie in dem Artikel beschrieben, arbeiten muss. Da geht es eigentlich nur noch darum, in der vorgegebenen Zeit eine bestimmte Menge an Musik zu produzieren. Und noch auf zig Änderungen und Re-Cuts kurzfristig zu reagieren. Ein musikalisches Gesamtkonzept ist unter solchen Umständen natürlich schwierig. Ausnahmen gibt es natürlich schon noch. Ich glaube schon, dass er für Burton oder jetzt auch wieder Raimi anders arbeitet.

Mehr Spaß hat er aber scheinbar bei kleineren Filmen. Wenn er mal wieder einen Elektro-Percussion-Score machen darf, für Gus Van Sant oder so. ;) Da greift er dann wohl auch seltener, wenn überhaupt, auf Assistenten zurück. Aber die Arbeitsweise dürfte bei vielen Indie-Filmen auch anders sein. Und ja, ähnlich wie Carpenter hat Elfman die Liebe zur Musik, die ohne Film auskommt, wiederentdeckt. Vor allem bei Elfman hat mich das sehr überrascht, da er seine Band Oingo Boingo 1995 aus freien Stücken aufgelöst hat. Ein Grund dafür war einfach Zeit, da seine Filmmusikkarriere da schon Fahrt aufgenommen hatte und es einfach unmöglich wurde, an mehreren Filmen im Jahr zu arbeiten, gleichzeitig ein neues Boingo-Album zu schreiben und dann damit auf Tour gehen. Hauptgrund für ihn war aber, dass sein Gehör durch die Live-Konzerte schon in Mitleidenschaft gezogen wurde und er nicht riskieren wollte, dass das noch schlechter wird. Er hat sich dann ja auch in den Jahrzehnten danach nicht mehr als Sänger einer Band auf der Bühne blicken lassen. Selbst bei den Boingo-Revivals, die die anderen Boingo-Mitglieder auf die Beine gestellt haben, und bei denen immerhin sogar Steve Bartek dabei war, hat Elfman sich nicht blicken lassen. Auch auf Social-Media-Kanälen hat sich Elfman eher rar gemacht. Und plötzlich vor knapp zwei Jahren: Boom! Er postet kleine Videos auf Instagram und Facebook, kurz darauf eine Akustik-Version eines alten Boingo-Songs und ehe man sich versieht kommt ein neuer Song und die Ankündigung eines Albums, sowie die Ankündigung, dass Elfman live bei Coachella damit auftreten wird. Wäre interessant zu erfahren, woher dieser plötzliche Wandel kommt. Vielleicht merkt er ja auch, dass Hollywood alleine auf Dauer langweilig ist. ;)

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Am 22.2.2022 um 08:16 schrieb Sebastian Schwittay:

Wie ist das eigentlich mittlerweile bei Beltrami? Beschäftigt der auch noch ungenannte Ghostwriter, oder machen das mittlerweile nur noch die genannten - und etablierten - Leute seines Teams (Trumpp, Torjussen, Roberts, Drubich, etc.)?

Mir fallen da aus dem Stegreif Steve Davis und Miles Hankins ein... die werden zumindest meist noch gelistet als additional composer. Denke die werden auch wiederum Leute unter sich haben.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Gast
Auf dieses Thema antworten...

×   Du hast formatierten Text eingefügt.   Formatierung jetzt entfernen

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Dein Link wurde automatisch eingebettet.   Einbetten rückgängig machen und als Link darstellen

×   Dein vorheriger Inhalt wurde wiederhergestellt.   Clear editor

×   Du kannst Bilder nicht direkt einfügen. Lade Bilder hoch oder lade sie von einer URL.


×
×
  • Neu erstellen...

Wichtige Information

Wir nutzen auf unserer Webseite Cookies, um Ihnen einen optimalen Service zu bieten. Wenn Sie weiter auf unserer Seite surfen, stimmen Sie der Cookie-Verwendung und der Verarbeitung von personenbezogenen Daten über Formulare zu. Zu unserer Datenschutzerklärung: Datenschutzerklärung/Impressum