Jump to content
Soundtrack Board
ronin1975

James Roy Horner (14. August 1953 – 22. Juni 2015)

Empfohlene Beiträge

hab eh die Tage schon sein PAS DE DEUX gehört, von dem ich den zweiten Satz eh schon unfassbar ergreifend fand und nun das dazu... lass es grad laufen und hab nen Kloss im Hals

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Gerade auch die Breaking News auf Bild.de gelesen beim aufstehen. Ich bin geschockt. Mein allererster Soundtrack den ich im Leben hörte war KRULL. So bin ich zur Filmmusik gekommen. Mein Beileid der Familie!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Irgendwie schlimm makaber, dass Horners LIebe zur Fliegerei ihm zum Verhängnis wurde.

 

Bin sehr verstört gerade, Horner war immer einer meiner Lieblingskomponisten und in den 80ern massgeblich dafür verantwortlich, dass mein Interesse für Filmmusik nicht flüchtig blieb.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

sehr traurige nachricht heute morgen. neben zimmer hab ich von james horner die meisten scores in meiner sammlung. Braveheart war meine erste cd von ihm. ich werde seine themen und seinen filmmusikstil vermissen.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Steh gerade richtig unter Schock.... denn seine Musik war für mich nie einfach nur schön anzuhörende Musik, nein... sie half mir so manchen schweren Lebenspunkt zu überstehen. Sie war.. nein sie ist sowas wie einer meiner besten Freunde, die immer für mich da ist, wenn ich sie brauche.
Allein dafür sag ich DANKE an JAMES HORNER.. vergessen werd ich dich und deine Musik nie.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Bin gerade echt fassungslos - kann kaum beschreiben, was in mir vorgeht, muss das erst mal sacken lassen...

So viele schöne Momente, die er uns mit seiner Musik beschert hat: Titanic, Braveheart, Aliens, Cocoon, Glory, Krull, Legends of the Fall, zuletzt überrascht von Le Dernier Loup und Pas de Deux...

Ich könnte heulen... :(

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Hab grad Tränen in den Augen. Man man, was eine Kacke. Er ist wohl mit seinem Kleinflugzeug verunglückt. Es ist sehr traurig, James war ein großer, es ist sehr schlimm, ich bin ziemlich geschockt. Nie wieder ein James Horner Stück, ich weiß nicht mehr zu sagen gerade. Meine Gedanken sind bei ihm.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Meine kleine (englischsprachige) Reminiszenz aus dem JWFanboard:

 

 

RIP James Roy Horner – a bit of soapboxing

 

One of those elusive creatures of the movie world that magically appeared at the right time at the right place - Spielberg's music-craving “new “ Hollywood, to be precise – James Horner was a most successful but also odd film composer, who reigned popular culture for a long time, longer than usual for most of his contemporaries. The end of an era, indeed.

 

Often the butt of jokes for several right and twice as many wrong reasons (mostly his idiosyncratic ways of musical expression), he possessed a talent to enhance movies, especially those with a big trust in their musical collaborator, with an uncanny ability. His insistence on often long and classically structured pieces that were fluid and, when called for, breathtakingly orchestrated betrayed the  unmistakable hand of a musical purist – a feat that is doubly impressive in his chosen field which is still dominated by musical wheeziness and lack of structure.

 

Mistakenly confused as heir to Spielberg's John Williams, partly due to both men’s heavy penchant for the russian masters, Horner actually had more in common with his short-time mentor Jerry Goldsmith, with whom he formed a strange love-hate relationship in later years. Though in many respects polar opposites, the gruff hemingwayesque Goldsmith vs. the more effeminate, shy Horner, there was a shared belief for catching a movie’s core with a simple, direct theme, augmenting it with more textural and motivic ideas and also, more importantly, a passion for experimentation and unusual instruments and timbres.

 

Horner, like Goldsmith, was a workhorse, though maybe with a slightly different motivation.  Since his early days  - he was only 25 when he started to enter the movie world - he was steadfast in establishing himself as a quintessential Hollywood animal, doing all kinds of movies, often up to 5 a year, in virtually all genres.

 

It was clear from the outset that his biggest gift was for melody and a willingness to break out of established musical memes, not afraid to cook up either shamelessly sentimental tunes that played like dusted-off reminders of the golden MGM era or assembling Bulgarian street musicians that hardly could understand a word of English in posh London recording studios for creating most wondrous synergies between orchestra and world music - it is to Horner’s credit that he early on was a vocal critic of the subdued racism and snobbish attitude of the conservative musical establishment.

 

The prize of big Hollywood success may have robbed us of some of Horner’s inventiveness though: with the heavy workload it soon became apparent that his biggest Achilles heel was his tendency to recycle material mercilessly (his own and that of others), a trait that worsened with later years.

 

Also, the formula and manipulative approach of many commercial pictures he worked on brought forth a likewise superficial side in his music that often helped to flatten potentially complex characters and situations to simple stereotypes that often sold even pictures for adult audiences like fairy tales, often with a heavy dose of sugar.

 

This of course made him a logical and sought-after collaborator for fantasy and children’s movies: those were his haven and while he abandoned them in later years for more portentous epics , there was an irresistible sweep to them, maybe the final proof that only movies as the one new art form of the 20th century, were able to release and contain the best of the past and the dazzling innovations of the future all at once, often within a single person.

 

Horner was able to go deeper when he wished: with more idiosyncratic artists like Mel Gibson he made a remarkable pair of pictures, ranging between bittersweet Americana of THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE to the ambitious BRAVEHART, a then-unexpected epic that made Horner a runaway success and which, apart from a few too-populist touches, also confirmed Horner’s attachment to strict classical forms and his eagerness to expose younger audiences to the beauty of, say,  Vaughan-Williams modal writing – and finally, the less-beloved stepbrother APOCALYPTO saw Horner return to the wholly experimental realms of his early days with its almost abstract synth-and-percussion approach.

 

In the fast-changing world of movies, Horner became somewhat of a bitter recluse in recent years. From what could be gathered from interviews, he felt hurt and rejected by the lack of loyalty and integrity of former collaborators but also betrayed a more wistful perspective on his profession.

 

His colourful approach to music is less and less in demand these days and even his slick SPIDER-MAN score, while fitting this picture, seemed hopelessly refined and pushing emotions that big tentpole pictures have long abandoned by now. He still hit home from time to time – though mostly for reliable standby’s like James Cameron or Jean-Jacques Annaud.

 

It remains an open question why he stubbornly refused to let go of certain trademarks that did their share to tarnish his reputation. It may have been for psychological reasons not easy to understand but for a composer who could with so much ease dream up fluid 10-minute pieces, it seems a bit puzzling.

 

I may close with a quote that is attributed to Billy Wilder and William Wyler, who at the burial of their admired colleague Ernst Lubitsch muttered to each other “Oh God, no more Lubitsch”, to which the other replied “Even worse, no more Lubitsch films!”.

 

So especially for this reason with a heavy heart, Goodbye James Horner!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Das ist sehr traurig. Er war ein Super-Komponist. Ich hatte immer gehofft, er würde nochmal einen "Star Trek"- oder "Alien"-Score machen und eventuell später "Star Wars" übernehmen. Sehr schade.

P.S.: So langsam gehen uns die ganzen großartigen Komponisten aus.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Sehr traurige Nachricht. Habe seine Karriere seit Ende der 70er Jahre immer aufmerksam verfolgt. Da werden mir heute Abend beim Hören von "Legends of the fall" garantiert die Tränen kommen. RIP James where ever you are!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Als ich das heute Morgen las, beschlich mich ein ähnliches Gefühl wie damals 2004, als ich vom Tode Jerry Goldsmiths erfuhr. Man kannte den Menschen zwar nicht persönlich, aber durch seine Musik und was sie einem bedeutet, ist es fast so, als kenne man zumindest ein wenig das Innere dieses Menschen. James Horner hatte wie Goldsmith, Bernstein oder Barry eine eigene Handschrift, die unverkennbar war. Sein Tod hinterlässt eine Lücke in der Filmmusik-Welt, wie es schon beim Tod von Jerry Goldsmith oder Elmer Bernstein war. Was bleibt sind unzählige großartige Horner-Scores. Er war ein Meister der Melodien, fand zu jedem Film und jedem Genre den passenden Zugang und nimmt nun den Platz zwischen den anderen großen Film-Komponisten ein, die nicht mehr unter uns sind.

 

Danke für die Musik, James.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Sehr traurige Nachricht. Habe seine Karriere seit Ende der 70er Jahre immer aufmerksam verfolgt. Da werden mir heute Abend beim Hören von "Legends of the fall" garantiert die Tränen kommen. RIP James where ever you are!

 

Bei mir beim Hören von Apollo 13 schon passiert. Es sind schon einige bekannte Menschen, die indirekt in meinem Leben mitgelaufen sind, gestorben, aber der Tod von James Horner trifft mich zum ersten Mal recht stark. 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Gast
Auf dieses Thema antworten...

×   Du hast formatierten Text eingefügt.   Formatierung jetzt entfernen

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Dein Link wurde automatisch eingebettet.   Einbetten rückgängig machen und als Link darstellen

×   Dein vorheriger Inhalt wurde wiederhergestellt.   Clear editor

×   Du kannst Bilder nicht direkt einfügen. Lade Bilder hoch oder lade sie von einer URL.


×
×
  • Neu erstellen...

Wichtige Information

Wir nutzen auf unserer Webseite Cookies, um Ihnen einen optimalen Service zu bieten. Wenn Sie weiter auf unserer Seite surfen, stimmen Sie der Cookie-Verwendung und der Verarbeitung von personenbezogenen Daten über Formulare zu. Zu unserer Datenschutzerklärung: Datenschutzerklärung/Impressum